$13.52

Coping Saw with Unique Blade Tensioning End Screw is a sturdy, professional saw that allows standard pin end coping saw blades to be tensioned at both ends (using the handle and thumb screw) for more precise cutting of intricate and irregular shapes with complete control! Blades can be turned 360º to saw in any direction – push or pull stroke. Depth of cut is 4-3/4in. Hardwood handle. Equipped with Olson’s 15 TPI blade. Here is what an expert says about this saw: About Coping Saws
What I like about coping saws is that they cut faster. I use an 18 tpi blade… (I think they’re made by Olson.) The blades cut wicked fast thanks to their deeper gullets. It takes me 12 to 14 strokes to remove the waste between dovetails… The other thing I like about the coping saw is that its throat is deeper (5″ vs. 2-3/4″ on the fret saw), which allows me to handle some drawers without turning the blade. Also, the blades are far more robust and almost never come loose. After the last couple weeks of constant dovetailing (hence all the dovetail posts – sorry about that), I think I’m going to put my fret saw away for a while. In other words, I’m going to stop fretting and just cope (sorry about that as well). — Christopher Schwarz, Editor Woodworking Magazine

Description

Coping Saw with Unique Blade Tensioning End Screw is a sturdy, professional saw that allows standard pin end coping saw blades to be tensioned at both ends (using the handle and thumb screw) for more precise cutting of intricate and irregular shapes with complete control! Blades can be turned 360º to saw in any direction – push or pull stroke. Depth of cut is 4-3/4in. Hardwood handle. Equipped with Olson’s 15 TPI blade. Here is what an expert says about this saw: About Coping Saws
What I like about coping saws is that they cut faster. I use an 18 tpi blade… (I think they’re made by Olson.) The blades cut wicked fast thanks to their deeper gullets. It takes me 12 to 14 strokes to remove the waste between dovetails… The other thing I like about the coping saw is that its throat is deeper (5″ vs. 2-3/4″ on the fret saw), which allows me to handle some drawers without turning the blade. Also, the blades are far more robust and almost never come loose. After the last couple weeks of constant dovetailing (hence all the dovetail posts – sorry about that), I think I’m going to put my fret saw away for a while. In other words, I’m going to stop fretting and just cope (sorry about that as well). — Christopher Schwarz, Editor Woodworking Magazine

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Orders will not be processed between Dec. 12-14 due to Inventory. Monday Dec. 17 order processing will resume. We apologize for the inconvenience. Dismiss